BEING A “HOME BODY”

Working out at a gym works for some – but many prefer working out at home. A home workout can be more flexible in terms of your time. It can save you a lot of money. For some, a home workout can be a way to ease into a fitness routine and get back into shape. For others, a home workout can supplement other sports activities. If you’re a homebody – we have a workout for your body at home.


BEFORE YOU BEGIN…

Stretch to protect your lower back – especially if you have a desk job, and you’re just starting with strength training. Warm up by kneeling down on one knee with the opposite foot trailing behind you. Keep your legs parallel to each other, hands on the bent knee, and let your hips sink forward to the floor, keeping your upper body straight. Don’t lean forward, and keep your knee in line with your ankle. Hold for 30 seconds and switch legs.

Another good stretch is this one: sit on the ground with one leg (left) extended and the other leg (right) bent and crossed over the left leg. Place your left arm on the outside of the right leg - and turn your torso to the right. Hold for 10-15 seconds and repeat on the other side.

You’re stretched so let’s get started!


TEN STRENGTH BUILDING EXERCISES FOR “HOME-BODIES”


BASIC PLANK

We probably all know how to do this one – but don’t forget to do it! It’s great for your core. To challenge yourself – try holding the plank for longer time periods. Start with 20 seconds.

CHAIR DIP

Need: chair. This is for the back of your arms. Sit on the edge of a step or chair, palms on each side and knees bent to 90-degrees. Now, move your hips forward, off the step, until your hands are supporting your weight. Slowly lower your body, keeping your back very close to the step. Lower yourself until your upper arms are parallel with the floor (if you can) and then slowly push yourself back up. Repeat three sets of 6-12 reps. 

DECLINE PUSH-UP

This is a push-up where you go downhill and it is more challenging than a regular push-up or a wide grip push-up. Place your feet on a stair step, on a sturdy chair or bench. Place your hands a little wider than shoulder-width apart, fingers facing forward, elbows slightly bent and eyes on the floor. Then place feet behind you on a sturdy chair or bench. Keep your body in a straight line, engage the abs, bend your elbows, and lower your chest towards the floor. Push back to starting position. Do three sets of 6-12 reps.

HAMMY-BLASTER

Need: chair. This one is for your hamstrings. Lie on the ground with your knees bent at a 90-degree angle and both heels on a chair or stair. Cross one ankle over the opposite thigh just above the knee. Now raise your hips as high as you can and keep your back straight -- do not arch. Pause at the top and slowly lower hips back to the ground and repeat. Switch legs. Do three sets of 6-12 reps.

POWER JUMPS

You could do jumping jacks or you could do a power jump. Jump training is also called plyometrics and it is not for beginners or for those with joint issues. To do a power jump, start in a squat position. Shift your hips back and down until your heels start to lift off the floor then explode up while swinging your arms overhead. Try to explode into a straight line (toes to fingertips). Land softly and then lower yourself back down into a squat. It’s harder than it sounds. Start with one set of six reps.

PULL-UPS

Need: A pull-up bar is great but you can also use a door frame, swing set, outdoor clothesline or indoor ceiling rafter. Pull-ups work arm and back muscles. To do a pull-up, turn your palms away to work more back muscles. Having the palms facing you works not just the back, but also targets the biceps. Grasp the chin-up bar and cross your legs to keep the lower body stable. Slowly pull your body up, bending your elbows, until your chin is level with the bar.  Pause, then slowly return to your starting position. Do three sets of 6-12 reps.

SPLIT SQUAT WITH BICEPS CURL

Need: chair and hand weights (or water jugs). Rest one foot on a chair well behind you, with your weight on your other bent leg. Keep your head up, eyes forward and weights at your side. While keeping the front knee directly over the ankle, slowly lower your hips by bending the front knee. Push back up and pull the weights up towards your shoulders. Do 6-10 reps and switch legs.

STANDING TUBING ROW

Need: Tubing with handles / door frame. This uses the same muscles as a pull-up, and also uses the core muscles. Attach the band to the doorjamb/hinge. Facing the door, grasp the handles with straight arms and tubing taut. Pull the handles towards you and lean back a little. Focus on bringing your shoulder blades back and together. Pause and slowly straighten arms back to the starting position without bending forward. Do three sets of 6-12 reps.

WIDE GRIP PUSH-UP

A wide grip makes the chest muscles work a little harder. Place your hands outside the shoulders. You should engage your core, thigh and glutes to get the most out of this or any push-up. Do three sets of 6-12 reps.

WOOD CHOP

Need: Tubing with handles / door frame. This is for your whole upper body. Attach the band to the top of a closed door - or to the door hinge. Start with feet hip-width apart, knees slightly bent, standing perpendicular to the door. Grab the band over your shoulder, trunk angled toward the band, and pull down to the opposite hip, rotating slightly. Slowly return. Repeat on the opposite side. Do three sets of 6-12 reps.
AT-HOME WORKOUT SCHEDULE

Any workout should include both cardio and strength training. A cardio workout is anything that gets your pulse up to 50-70% of your maximum heart rate. To figure out what that rate may be, subtract your age from 220. If you are 40 years old, then your maximum is 180 and your pulse during endurance activities should be 50-70% of that which is 90 to 135 beats per minute.

Whether you’re seeking to get fit, or lose weight, or both – here is a workout schedule that you can use.


FOR WEIGHT LOSS: 3 CARDIO, 2 WORKOUT

  • Monday: At-home Workout
  • Tuesday: Cardio, 30 – 60 minutes
  • Wednesday: Cardio, 30 – 60 minutes
  • Thursday: At-home Workout    
  • Friday: Cardio, 30 – 60 minutes
  • Saturday: Rest    
  • Sunday: Rest

FOR BUILDING MUSCLE: 2 CARDIO, 3 WORKOUT
  • Monday: At-home Workout
  • Tuesday: Cardio, 30 – 60 minutes
  • Wednesday: At-home Workout
  • Thursday: Cardio, 30 – 60 minutes
  • Friday: At-home Workout
  • Saturday: Rest    
  • Sunday: Rest



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