20 Halloween Tips

Halloween is celebrated by many. Let’s keep it fun and safe!
  • Reflect on it. Costumes should be bright and reflective. Consider adding reflective tape or striping trick-or-treat bags.
  • I see you. Masks can limit or block eyesight, so consider makeup and decorative hats instead. Make sure they are flame resistant.
  • Avoid pointy sticks. You could poke an eye out.
  • Lights on. Make sure flashlights with fresh batteries are available for children and their escorts.
  • Pumpkin carving. Small children can draw a design that parents cut, or draw on the pumpkin with markers. Use a votive in the pumpkin instead of a candle.
  • Pumpkin placement. Put your pumpkin on a sturdy table and away from cloth (curtains or costumes). Don’t leave a lit pumpkin unattended.
  • Tidy yard.  If you’re going to welcome trick-or-treaters, make sure they won’t trip over rakes, hoses or other objects.
  • Protected from pooches. Dogs not only bark at the doorbell, they sometimes escape into the yard. Restrain your pets so they don’t scare or knock over young children.
  • Accompanied. Always. A parent or responsible adult should always accompany children younger than 12.
  • Stay outside. Trick-or-treaters (especially older children on their own) should only go to homes with a porch light on and never enter a home or car for a treat.
  • Watch for cars.  Pedestrian injuries are the most common injuries to children on Halloween.
  • Eat first. Kids should have a good meal before heading out so they are less likely to overeat the sweets.
  • Non-food treats are fine. You could give out coloring books, pens and pencils, or quarters.
  • Check the candy. Parents should examine the candy and toss anything any spoiled, unwrapped or suspicious items.
  • Rationing. Ration the treats after Halloween.
  • When driving, have your lights on high beam for greater visibility. Slow down and be especially alert in residential neighborhoods because excited children may move in unpredictable ways.
  • Have a route. For kids 12 or older, have a route that is known to others, and stick to it. Arrange a backup location to meet your friends if you get separated.
  • Phone batteries. Cell phones are great for emergencies. Make sure yours is charged.
  • Cross at corners. They’re more likely to be lit, and drivers are more likely to spot the trick-or-treaters.
  • Be alert. 5:30-9:30 is the typical time for trick-or-treating. Drivers should be alert – and kids should stick to sidewalks or roadsides.